Skip to main content

About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
CNNW 14
CSPAN 14
MSNBCW 13
CNBC 9
CSPAN2 9
CNN 4
KGO (ABC) 4
KNTV (NBC) 4
KPIX (CBS) 4
FBC 3
LINKTV 3
MSNBC 3
KQED (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 125
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 125 (some duplicates have been removed)
are looking at fourth and eighth graders, fourth graders in reading and mathematics and science and eight the greatest in mathematics and science. >host: we have special number set up if you want to join this conversation -- what do we learn as we dig into help fourth graders and eighth graders are doing? guest: the broad strokes over view, we see that our fourth graders, they're reading has improved as well as mathematics but their silence is largely not changed compared to the previous administration. over the longer term, they have improved and their eight th graders have not improved much. in general, the assessments compare the u.s. to a variety of countries and education systems within countries. some of our state's took the assessment independently along with the u.s. total. when you look over the entire set, i would say the u.s. among these countries shows up in the top 10 or 12 countries or systems. host: we can see who was included in the fourth grade reading study. why these countries? guest: they are given the same tests so much of the efforts in an international asset as maki
a point? >> well, i think they definitely a point, neil. economics is a very dynamic social science. there is a latin phrase that means, all things being the same. the democratic policy approach is everything's the same. we can increase tax rateses or in france, we can increase them to 75% and everything else will be the same. but that's not how it works. it's a very dynamic world, where incentives mean something and punishments mean something. so when someone says, we are going to take in california, as mickelson said, we are going to be taking 60-odd percent of your income, or in france, the state's taking 75% of your income, people with the means to move will say, there has to be a place that would be happier to have me and would not -- >> neil: that has been nevada for a lot of californians. there has been a money flight from california for sometime now. mickelson put a face to it. he has dialed that back, checking in with sponsors who didn't share that view. or maybe he wasn't supposed to. but he dialed it back. and sarkozy has his own tax issues and there may be more to the st
to rebuild it that way. this is the last part, from the science perspective. here's my ask. who's making the decisions about where we build, how we build? and if in a summit with the united states you're going to think it's the federal government. no. some of you might think it's the state government. not really. where do these decisions get made? local officials. whether their city or county commissions, land-use planning board. this is where the decisions are made every day wear, added up, the risk exposure occurs, but on a day-to-day translational basis you probably don't see this. but this is where decisions are made about where we build, how we build, types of building codes were going to enforce. right? yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure, particularly on the downturn that generate revenue how well the generate revenue? jobs and growth. have you ever seen anybody running for office thing i want our community to get smaller? it's always jobs and growth. that's like a mantra. that's how we go tax bases. they're having to make decisions that oftentimes our short-term
of high character men who are great teachers, men who are experts in the science of football the science of our game that are detailed in organized in our specialists and want to and care about our players and are willing to do what ever it takes on a daily basis to help the master the aircraft i get to do the job i have the most fun with. i get to be thatthe team's compass and the gps system of the team every day they will know where we are where we are going and how we are going to get there. he has already had a brief meeting with j. cutler they had nothing but good to say about each other. there are some things they can do to make him better which is exactly what phil emery wanted to hear from his new coach results gave me the confidence it gave me a lot of confidence that he could manage a team orchestrate all sides of it and have a unique special relationship with a quarterback and a lot of people take a look at bat and say we're talking about an individual somebody who has a high degree of technical expertise. that could be the best on the team in terms of work ethic being a team
, we are asking why do we cheat? the science and emotions behind it. we are talking to doctors and psychiatrists and a human lie detector. how can you spot a lie? don't miss the why we cheat special. president obama faces a lot of challenges in his second term. one of them centers around america's security. we will look at the threats next. lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jas
course of action is not getting the flu shot. a story from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: today's study addresses two of the biggest concerns about the flu vaccine and pregnancy. the conclusion, the vaccine is safe, both for pregnant women and their unborn children. >> by getting an influenza vaccine, mothers are not only protecting themselves, but they're protecting the baby too. >> reporter: valerie isabelle was born quite healthy on tuesday. her mother, layla, got a flu shot back in october. >> i got it before the flu season started, when i was a little shy of seven months. >> reporter: this study, the largest to date, looked at more than 117,000 pregnancies in norway, which has free health care and keeps excellent medical records. the study found that women who contracted the flu while pregnant had almost twice the chance of a miscarriage. but even as they got the flu, after getting vaccinated, the chance of miscarriage still went down. and most important, it showed the flu shot itself did not increase the chance of miscarriage or put the baby at risk. fo
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> the tech world was rocked last week by news of the suicide of 26-year-old internet activist aaron schwartz, the computer programmer and free information advocate was facing up to 35 years in prison if convicted on federal charges of computer hacking and wire fraud over the illicit downloading of million academic and subscription data base and charges his family and supporters say the amount of prosecutorial overreach contributed to schwartz's decision to take his own life. the u.s. attorney is pushing back against the claims saying her office acted fairly and responsibly, and offered schwartz a six month prison sentence in exchange for guilty plea to 13 felony counts. a deal schwartz rejected. wall street journal editorial board member has been following the story and joins us now. joe, who was aaron schwartz and why was it it a big deal. >> he's an important figure in the digital world in the sense he's an open source activist. he advocates an ideology says that in
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> have you joined the "politics nation" conversation on facebook yet? we hope you will. kerry says the majority of americans want a bit more gun regulation and i'm glad our president hears our voices. richard says now congress needs to act. "politics nation" fans also sounded off on the nra's new controversial ad. jeffrey says this crosses the line. belinda says the nra is the reason why we can't have a reasonable discussion about guns in this country. we'll tell you more about that ad next. but, first, we want to hear your thoughts. please, head over to facebook and search "politics nation" and like us to join the conversation that keeps going long after the show ends. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> politicians and special interests all on an assault on li
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story outfront. gun battle. president obama proposed 23 executive actions. 23. among them, ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. background checks. and strengthening mental health reporting and regulation. the nra said only honest law abiding gun owners will be affected and our children will remain vulnerable to the inevitability of more tragedy. what is the nra's strategy when it comes to this debate. >> are the president's kids more important than yours. >> reporter: in a hard hitting response the nra has rolled out this ad saying the president is happy to have armed secret service agents protecting his children but for everyone else. >> a hypocrit when it comes to fair share of security. >> reporter: it is the latest muscle flex by the gun group superpack which last year spent more than $16 million to influence political races. that is not a tremendous amount for such efforts. big oil, the pharmacy industry and retired people have more and better
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story, gun battle. president obama proposed 23 actions that would help reduce gun violence. among them, ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, background checks. that is no surprise. strengthening mental health reporting and regulation. in reaction to the president, nra said, i'll quote them, only honest, law-abiding gun owners will be affected and our children will remain vulnerable. what is the nra strategy when it comes to this debate? here is tom foreman with an out front investigation on how the nra gets what it wants. >> are the president's kids more important than yours? >> in a hard-hitting response to calls to are new gun restriction, the nra has rolled out this ad attacking the white house saying the president is happy to have armed secret service agents protecting his children but for everyone else -- >> he is just another elitist hypocrite when it comes to a fair share of security. >> reporter: it is the latest muscle flex by the gun grou
sports and all society have to reckon with at some point is the fact that the technology and science are going to raise these questions over and over again as we go forward. because it's not totally clear where you start -- where you draw the lines. right now we think tommy johns surgery is okay, even though you come back with a stronger arm than you had before. that's a medical enhancement. that's not something that's part of your natural gift. that's something that you earned. at some point we'll have laser surgery that will allow them to see better. is that a drug? is that something you should be allowed to have or not? people will be able to do things scientifically, technologically to their bodies to make them better performers without any effort. so where do the lines get drawn? how do we figure out how to cope with the march of science? >> like a futurologist. >> last month bartolo colon, came back from a 93 miles an hour. >> that's okay but hgh isn't. again, where do the lines get drawn? >> the reason i'm here today is because i had my blood spun last night. >> juicing. >> i'
have got even very good at the science of this. it's not perfect, and i think one of the reasons that this is coming out is because it's obvious that it's not perfect, but it's good enough to catch people. lance armstrong has been caught. jenna: a quick follow-up to this, since you were working with this agency since 1999, did you have any indication, i mean did you feel like you had information that was for sure that he was doing this. and just couldn't peg it on him? what was it like inside the agency? well, we really don't get involved in our committee as to the various case ed casess that are being prosecuted. we are more involved with what constitutes a doping offense. a doping offense does not necessarily mean a positive drug terbgs it can be other violations of the process with the same sanctions. jenna: a quick final question to the doctor then i want you to weigh into this as well. based on what you no about the races and what kind of substances might be used, how many people would it take to elude these types of tests. >> it's a rather complex business. it's sophisticat
, to the colorado science teacher that was fired after school officials found out she once starred in pornographic movies. gio benitez has the story. good morning, gio. >> reporter: good morning, elizabeth. what this california teacher hoped would end as a story of redemption, as become a cautionary tale. what you do in the past can come back to haunt you. and this morning, her porn actress past may have gotten her banned from working in a classroom again. her 12-year-old and 13-year-old middle school students knew her as miss halas, the science teacher. but fans of 32-year-old stacie hal halas, knew her as tiffany six, the porn star. now, she's out of a job, banned from teaching. a panel of three california judges unanimously agreeing tuesday that her hard-core past has no place in the classroom. >> we've had a viral buzz going around with 12-year-olds and 13-year-olds showing porn. >> reporter: the oxnard school district initially fired halas last april, after students discovered she performed in at least 18 x-rated films. from 2005, to 2006. in a behind-the-scenes interview, halas reportedly ta
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. lori: baby, it's cold outside, the coldest it's been in years for many places but chicago hasn't been below zero degrees in more than 700 days. it hasn't had a inch of snow in more than 300 days. is that about to change with the cold blast moving east? janice in the fox weather center how long the sub-zero temperatures will last. >> this is old school cold, huh, ladies? i'm from canada. big puffy coats on. some places we're dealing with dangerous cold and dangerous wind chilled. air temperature combined with wind, what it feels like if you're not bundledded up and not protected. minus 23 in international falls. minus 18 in green bay. that is the windchill, the real feel temperature. that continues across the great lakes and northeast where it feels like 12 here in new york. a lot of new yorkers complaining today. minus eight what it feels like in buffalo and minus two in syracuse. windchill advisories, feels like anywhere between minus 30 and minus 50 below zero and where you see advisory, 10 to 20 below zero. it
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> next monday president obama will be sworn into office for his second presidential term, and we continue our look back at great inaugural moments. here is the first president who was born in the 20th century, john f. kennedy. >> let the word go forth from this time and place to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of americans born in this century, tempered by war disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage, and unwilling to witness or permit the small undoing of those human rights to which this nation has always been committed and to which we are committed today at home and around the world. >> wow. later in that speech jfk said another of his most famous lines, ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. it's a line he paraphrased from george st. john, the headmaster at his prep school. i learned that nugget while researching for my book, "jac
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >>> our second story "outfront," breakingous. cnn has learned that one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. i want to get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. jill, what can you tell us about this man who has lost his life? >> erin, the latest information we're getting is the name of that american who did die. it's coming in a statement from victoria nuland who is the spokesperson for the state department. she said that his name was fredrick butaccio and he died in that hostage situation. the state department is expressing its deepest condolences to the family and also the friends of fredrick. but they're not giving any details and that is one thing that has plagued it's information coming out of algeria ever since this began. we do know from a u.s. official that six americans, however, were freed or escaped, and others still are unaccounted for. earlier friday victoria nuland also said that some americans are being held hostage. so the bottom line here is that of it continues to be an operation w
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our third story "outfront," is the nra unbeatable. the powerful gun lobbying group has seen its membership grow by more than 250,000 in the past month and this is even more stunning. it added more than 30,000 new members on the day of the president's press conference. 30,000 people in one day. while president obama has made gun control a priority in this term, he's still struggling to get the american people on his side. the latest cnn poll show that is 49% of americans disapprove of how the president has handled gun control and that's even after this ad which was criticized by democrats and republicans alike. >> are the president's kids more important than yours? then why is he skeptical about putting armed security in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards at their school? >> is the nra winning the gun debate even in spite of an ad like that? "outfront" continue aaron blake a political reporter for "the washington post" who wrote about this topic today and cnn contributors reihan salam and roland martin. you gave t
is really more an art than a science. a forest of beeping monitors can't always tell a doctor if a patient is truly unconscious. >> a way to inject a little current -- >> reporter: the new issue of "the atlantic" on stands today reports on what may be a breakthrough. a new approach that could monitor consciousness itself. >> you don't want the patient to move, to feel any pain, to have any memory. >> reporter: dr. giulio tonino's work looks at the brain. his theory? all the electrical signals -- sight, sound, pain, spreading across the brain -- creates consciousness. think of it as flipping a light switch, with light spilling into all the rooms of your brain. in surgery, anesthesia closes the doors, the lights, the electrical signals can't spread. that's when you are truly unconscious. tonino's new awareness monitor stimulates the brain with an electric current to see if it spreads. a truly unconscious brain would have no reaction. a brain conscious during surgery would. >> you're actually injecting current to the brain and finding out whether the various parts of the brain are talking to
. the job market has not turned sour for computer science majors, facebook pin terrorist. the most loved degree healthcare administration. the labor department predicts that 28 percent of all new jobs will be in healthcare by 2020. >> both in college maybe they can switch college. >> my major was not on one of those lists. >> communications. >>> the time now 9 minutes after the hour. an armored truck robbed at gun point in broad daylight. lou holtz weighing in on the manti te'o story. he has advice. >> attorney general eric holder asking a court to squirt the law. asking them not to release documents on the botched fast and furious operation. judicial watch made the request 7 months ago on the freedom of information act. the century aurora theater scared by a tragic reopening its doors 6 months after james holmes allegedly killed 12 people. survivors first responders and families of the victims attended and viewed a private screening of the new hobbit movie. >>> overnight routers reporting a plane in algeria to rescue any remaining hostages taken in the terror raid on the gas plant. we k
get the story tonight from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell. >> reporter: jake is a perfectly normal 16 years old but when he was 2 years old, shown on in these videotapes, he was diagnosed with severe autism, the widespread disorder that affects a child's ability to have social interactions. >> he stopped relating. he wasn't interested in other kids, and by his second birthday he stopped speaking entirely. >> reporter: after two years of intensive therapy 40 hours a week, he was declared free of autism, and he remains so to this day. >> when i look at the videos when i'm 2 years old, i cannot believe that at one point in my life that was me. >> reporter: new research from the university of connecticut closely studying 34 such cases including jake includes the outcome is real. therapy does bring a cure in some cases, and it is often with kids who were severely autistic. >> they had very little language when they were 2 and 3 years old, and they were really, most of them classically autistic. >> reporter: but the good news comes with caveats. researchers caution
, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. we'll restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its costs. we'll harness harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. and we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. all this we can do. all this we will do. now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions, who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done, what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose and necessity to courage. what the cynics that to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them, that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a ret
. the things that we have to fix are the basics. they're not hard, they're not rocket science, but we just have to achieve consensus. my optimism comes from the fact that historically america has been willing to face the hard problems, be dynamic, change things, not get stuck in gridlock. right now it's unsettling how unabler two make progress. but i thi there's an underlying optimism i have that just because of the very historical nature of this country and certainly there's no reason why we can't be competitive. you know, it's really going to be our choice in terms of how we behave, what kind of policies we set, how we work together between business and government and, you know, i'm optimistic that we'll sort it out but, boy, it sure looks ugly right now. >> susie: for more on michaelportier's research and articles go to nbr.com and check out our partnership with some of the nation's top business schools like harvard. >> tom: while beer wasn't invented in america, u.s. brewers are thinking small to make it big. small craft brewers are claiming a bigger stake of the industry's annual $300 bill
of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america, mr. obama called on congress to provide a legal path to citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our worse rather than ex--- work force rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shooting massacre which caused him to push for gun control and a polarizing fight with congress he had previously avoided. >> our journey is not complete until all our children from the streets of detroit to the hills of after -- appalachia to the lands of newtown know they are cherished and always safe. >> reporter: there was one line tailored specifically for a republican audience. it called to reform or eliminate an efficient -- eliminate inefficient or irrelevant government programs. th
worse in history than they do in math and science. >> one of the reasons is that kids are bored by it because it is taught -- they know the ending. that is why history is not popular. we end up like a tv serial, the good guys who come out ok. they want the juicy stuff, the horrible stuff. when lynne cheney was at the national endowment of humanities, she was very active in suppressing and changing history books. texas has been very active in keeping what our leadership does badly out of the books. >> and that is the standard for textbooks all over the country, texas. >> i want to go back to the moment we first talked about, when henry wallace is defeated to be the vice-presidential running mate, as he had been the time before, for fdr. why did fdr give in? he had been so powerful? he had bucked the system before. he was a little bit more like obama today, but circumstances changed him. >> what changed him was the uprising on the left. in 1934, the massive strike movement, the rise of upton sinclair, there was a massive upsurge of the left in the mid- 1930's. the republican right
that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthquake country. that fact was demonstrated by the different experiences in death and destruction in haiti where earthquake resilientcy is nonexistent and chile that took its playbook from california. that's why i'm optimistic that science and engineering cals make the coastle zone a safer place to live. there are important differences between the problem of earthquake hazards and coastal hazards. if we put aside those umph bumper stick thears say stop plate tectonics. huges have an effect on the rate -- humans have the an effect on the rate and the intensity of earthquakes. on the other hand, we have increased coastal hazards by increasing the rate of wetland loss anbar yur island erosion and sea level rise. what this means in addressing coastal hazards we need to confront both mother nature and the enhanced risk from impacts. i would argue the philosophy we have to approach this with is exactly the same. scientists can make recommendati
the arkansas of these conversations goes is it begins this sort of a conversation that h.g. wells and science fiction, you realize a few years later, that's what we are doing. you began at the right point about climate change now is integral to every conversation about urban design especially when you are situated on the ocean or a river rising, you say, we've got to do this now there is no question. i see there is a new report coming out if the from the federal government that says there is no question that these climate event did are triggered by climate change. we have to deal with it. we have to think in dramatically different ways. >> it's good to know people have that vision and see the need there. on the gun issue, elliott, i think andrew cuomo comes across as a real mensch and a real leader. do you agree. >> i think it's a good moment for new york state government. i think the next hard question will be when people parse the statute: what does it get done? does it do enough? i think it just is with the president's executive orders, acting is good becau
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> a 26-year-old aaron swartz was found in his brooklyn apartment. the medical examiner said he hanged himself. he was facing a federal trial on accusations that he stole scientific journals from an mit computer archive. >> cenk: one point that is not entirely accurate is he had legal access to those archives. the government charged him with violating the terms of service with that contract. they claimed that was a felony. he was facing 50 years in prison which is unbelievable. now there are people throughout the internet and the politico sphere saying that the prosecution of aaron swartz was unbelievable and ridiculous. here is a blog post that is a website for the person who wrote it from the cato institute. the government seems to have lost all sense of proportion here and the apparent legal theory behind the government's case that using a website in a manner that violates it's terms of use constitution felony computer hacking could serious unintended consequences. do you know the government now was char
. how to stop talking about legitimate rape and insulting women, science 101, creating tax breaks and tax shelters for millionaire campaign donors and, after that ppp poll showing how unpopular congress really is, there's how to increase our approval ratings. what root canals, traffic jams, cockroaches, and head lice are doing to us. and republicans are presumably doing wrong i guess. >>> up next, the house of representatives will be voting tonight on a big aid package for the victims of hurricane sandy. but will republicans go along with it? especially from the south. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. southern tornado, for example, no one raised the question of spending cuts. but now in the northeast, when the aid was needed there, this issue of fiscal conservatism and trying to trim the budget in one place to help others elsewhere became so heated. so what you've got now is it was a process but they have passed more than $50 billion in aid. it covers a range of things including money for fema to rebuilding transportation and so forth. it has to go back to the s
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. and these come together, one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> we finish tonight with this. once upon time, the republican
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive.
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. hershey's simple pleasures chocolate. 30% less fat, 100% delicious. >> cenk: we're back on the "young turks." we start with manti te'o. michael has more. >> guys and j.r., this is one of the most unbelievable stories i have ever heard. this guy, notre dame player has a girlfriend that inspired his season, but the girlfriend may not exist the girlfriend died, the girlfriend may not have ever lived. let's let nbc tell us more about it. >> the love of my life. >> that love supposedly losing her battle with leukemia. miss decision to play against michigan instead of going to her funeral. >> she had so many problems, and that you'll play and honor me. >> his performance on the field made him a front runner for the heisman trophy. it turns out the girlfriend homogamete on line, never had leukemia, never died, never existed. manti te'o said he was duped. >> the big question is whether he was duped or he was trying to do that people. >> uh-huh. >> he will talk more about whether it was his doing, but basical
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood hostility, agitation depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these stop taking chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems tell your doctor if you have
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> this is a fox news alert. the bloody siege of the natural gas complex in the sahara desert is over. aalgerian special forces killed the mit militants who for four s held hundreds of hodges including several americans. the sad news is at least 23 of the hostages were killed. the president has just released this statement. today the thoughts and prayers of the american people are with the families of all those who were killed and injured in the terrorist attack in algeria. the blame for this tragedy rests with the terrorists who carried it out, and the united states condemns their actions in the strongest possible terms. meanwhile, on a happier note tonight, in washington the first lady and daughters sasha and malia opened the inauguration weekend honoring the children of military families. it starred katy perry. [ music ] >> usher and the cast of glee also performed, but it was michelle obama's hair do is what folks were talking about. >> this is what inaugurati
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. "huckabee." ner, now, back to huckabee. >> we're back with larry and i want to remind you again, larry has written what you'll convinced is the most methodical, logical and rational understanding of this entire issue that i've ever seen, a long and thorough piece, we've got a link at mikehuckabee.com. and i want you to read it if you're rd in a lot mo-- interested in it in a lot more depth. the and nra proposed it and the president's plan seems more like armed police officers, resource officers, but you say if we had teachers who were trained in schools and were armed, they could prevent the kind of shootings, or at least maybe stop them before they get out of hand, like what happened at sandy hook. but that scares people, armed teachers. should they be afraid of that? >> no, and when i say armed teachers, i don't mean mandatory arming all teachers by no means, but most people don't realize that already in the state of utah, there are armed teachers b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 125 (some duplicates have been removed)